De Santas says Florida did not apply for COVID-19 wax for young children because of ‘danger’

Florida Gov. Ron de Santis on Thursday Defended his state’s decision. Do not apply for the COVID-19 vaccine for young children before the expected federal approvals.

De Santas backed his health department’s decision, saying he was opposed to vaccinating young children.

“We are positively recommending COVID waxing for young children, especially six-month-olds and two-year-olds,” he told a news conference.

Florida is the only state in the country that has not applied for a vaccine for children aged six months to five years, a decision critics say could delay access to Sunshine State residents.

Its health department has chosen to take food from its personal physicians instead of distributing orchestras to parents at the state level. The Miami Herald was the first to report.

“Our health department is very clear,” de Santes said. “These risks outweigh the benefits and we are recommending against it. It’s not like banning it. People can access it if they want to.”

But de Santas argued Thursday that young children are less at risk than COVID-19 and blamed “media hysteria” for spreading parents’ fears.
Damon Higgins / The Palm Beach Post via AP

The decision has been criticized this week by the governor’s political rivals, who have stressed that Floridians will face more challenges in obtaining food.

Democratic candidate for governor of Florida Charlie Crust called it “reckless and irresponsible.”

“Governor de Santis has once again spoken of protecting the people of Florida from epidemics,” Crust said in a statement, “and his latest failure is aimed at our children.”

But de Santas argued Thursday that young children are less at risk than COVID-19 and blamed “media hysteria” for spreading parents’ fears.

    A nurse gives a little girl a shot of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine.
De Santas backed his health department’s decision, saying he was opposed to vaccinating young children.
Paul Hansie / Supa Images / Light Rocket by Getty Images

“It’s a lot of misinformation,” he insisted. “That’s why they’re scared. Emergency use for a six-month-old or a one-year-old is just to reduce anxiety – it’s not standard when you’re doing it. The standard is if it’s safe. And is effective.

The Food and Drug Administration voted this week to approve Pfizer and Moderna vaccines for young children, and the agency is expected to formally approve them soon.